Lectures

The Faculty lecture list is available online. Undergraduate lectures and graduate seminars are normally only open to current students of the University. Non-members of the University should contact the relevant lecturer or seminar organiser as well as the manager of the relevant venue in advance for permission to attend. All lectures take place in Weeks 1-8 of term and last for one hour unless otherwise stated.

Please note the following indications in the online lecture list:

* This class is only open to students by prior invitation.

(biennial) This lecture/class is given in alternate academic years and will not be repeated next year.

(lc) This lecture series will be recorded on the Panopto lecture capture system.

Academic staff and students of other universities and members of the public are welcome to attend research seminars and public lectures held in the Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies. Term cards for research seminars are published at Seminars.

Prospectuses for lectures and graduate seminars

Where lecturers have provided prospectuses for their lecture series or graduate seminars, they are listed below. Prospectuses are not available for all lecture series.

Aristophanes' Political Comedy

Dr K Sekita; Prof C Güthenke

These lectures are for the Special Subject “Aristophanes’ Political Comedy” for Honour Moderations in Classics and the  Preliminary Examination in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.

Cicero and Catiline

Dr A Gartrell; Prof G Hutchinson

These lectures are for the Special Subject “Cicero and Catiline” for Honour Moderations in Classics and the  Preliminary Examination in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.

Comedy (Class)

Dr B Taylor; Dr G Westwood

This class is for Subject 507: “Comedy” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

Early Greek Hexameter Poetry: Homer, Odyssey

Dr A Kelly

These lectures are for Subject 505: “Early Greek Hexameter Poetry” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

Euripides, Orestes: Text

Dr S Scullion

These lectures are for Subject 513: “Euripides, Orestes: papyri, manuscripts, text” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

Four Key Concepts for the Classicist

Prof G Hutchinson

These introductory lectures are not geared towards any particular paper, but anyone beginning to study Greco-Roman antiquity at university level will potentially find them useful.

Greek and Latin Metres

Dr A D'Angour

These introductory lectures are not geared towards any particular paper, but anyone studying Greek or Latin poetic texts will potentially find them useful.

Greek Coins I

Dr V Heuchert

Essential for the CAAH paper on 'Greek and Roman Coins' and for the M. Stud. and M. Phil. options in Greek Coinage / Greek Numismatics, but open to all with an interest in Greek history or coinage.

The lectures aim to provide an introduction to Archaic and Classical Greek coins and to the ways we study them. Lectures in Hilary Term will focus on Hellenistic coins. There will be an opportunity at the end of each lecture to examine a selection of relevant coins.

1. The Beginning of Coinage in Electrum
2. Early Greek Silver Coinage
3. The Spread of Coinage and Reasons for Minting
4. Coinage and the Athenian Empire (Jack Kroll)
5. Greek Coin Iconography
6. Sicilian Coinage
7. Coin Use
8. Bronze Coinage
Greek Language: Xenophon, Anabasis 3

Prof T Rood

These lectures are aimed at the Greek Language paper for Honour Moderations in Classics. There is a difference in prescription depending on which course is being taken: Anabasis III.1-3.5 for IA and IC; III.1 for IB and IIB. Material to be covered for those reading for courses IB and IIB will be covered in weeks 1 and 2, though all are welcome to later lectures. The set text is the revised Loeb, ed. Dillery, available at https://www.loebclassics.com/; it would be helpful if you have access to the prescribed text. There is a recent commentary on the set text in the Cambridge Green & Yellow series, edited by Luuk Huitink and Tim Rood; a list of divergences between this text and the Loeb is available on the WebLearn page of the Greek Language paper.

The following sections of Book III will be covered each week:

Week 1: 1.1-1.23
Week 2: 1.24-1.47
Week 3: 2.1-2.22
Week 4: 2.22-3.5

You will get most from the lectures if you prepare the relevant section in advance of each lecture.

Hellenistic Poetry

Prof J Lightfoot

Weeks 1, 2, 4–6: Conduit Room, New College
Week 3: Lecture Room 6, New College

Week 1: Alexandria and the Ptolemies
Week 2: Alexandria and "learned” poetry
Week 3: Greek and non-Greek
Week 4: Apollonius of Rhodes: (i) Apollonius and Homer
Week 5: Apollonius of Rhodes: (ii) Male and Female
Week 6: Apollonius of Rhodes: (iii) Narrative

Historiography

Prof R Ash; Prof T Rood

This lecture series is primarily intended for students taking the Historiography option (503) for Greats, but we welcome any others who are interested. The lectures, designed to dove-tail with the Historiography classes running in MT Weeks 5-8 and HT Weeks 1-4, will proceed on an author-by-author basis while paying particular attention to the set-texts for the Historiography option.

The weekly lectures will proceed as follows:

1. Historiography and why it matters (Joint lecture, R. Ash and T. Rood);
2. Herodotus (T. Rood);
3. Thucydides (T. Rood);
4. Xenophon (T. Rood);
5. Caesar (R. Ash);
6. Sallust (R. Ash);
7. Livy (R. Ash);
8. Tacitus (R. Ash).
Historiography (Class)

Prof R Ash; Prof T Rood

This class is for Subject 503: “Historiography” in  the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools. 

Homer and Early Greek

Prof P Probert

Four sessions geared towards second-year undergraduates taking the 'Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology' paper in Classics Mods, or in any of the joint schools, and for undergraduates taking the 'Comparative Philology: Indo-European, Greek and Latin' paper in Greats, or in any of the joint schools. Other interested people (graduates and undergraduates) are very welcome.

A practical class with two complementary aims: (i) to exploit some basic notions of Greek comparative and historical linguistics in order to understand the main features of the epic language, and (ii) to use the epic language as a practice ground for the basic notions of Greek historical grammar. We shall read brief passages of Homer and think about the linguistic features that combine to give Homeric language its distinctive character. Handouts will be provided. Topics will be: 1. Linguistic variation in pre-Hellenistic Greece and the importance, nature and influence of the Homeric language. 2. Archaic features of the epic language and their treatment in the tradition. 3. Dialect mixture in Homer. 4. Archaisms and innovations in the epic language.

 

NB The 'Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology' paper will include an optional question that will allow candidates to show knowledge of the texts discussed, and the 'Comparative Philology: Indo-European, Greek and Latin' will include a compulsory one, but the classes will also serve as general revision classes for Greek philology.

 

These classes will be repeated next year.

Homer, Iliad

Dr C Metcalf

These lectures are aimed at the “Homer: Iliad” paper for Honour Moderations in Classics.

Inscriptional Evidence for the Early History of Latin

Prof P Probert

Four sessions geared towards second-year undergraduates taking the 'Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology' paper in Classics Mods, or in any of the joint schools, and for undergraduates taking the 'Comparative Philology: Indo-European, Greek and Latin' paper in Greats, or in any of the joint schools. Other interested people (graduates and undergraduates) are very welcome.

The classes will exploit the knowledge acquired in last year's lectures on historical phonology and morphology, to show how philological expertise can help us improve our understanding of the language of ancient texts. Some early Latin inscriptions will be considered, and points of linguistic interest highlighted and explained. Hand-outs will be provided.

NB The 'Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology' paper will include an optional question that will allow candidates to show knowledge of the texts discussed, and the 'Comparative Philology: Indo-European, Greek and Latin' will include a compulsory one, but the classes will also serve as general revision classes for Latin philology.

These classes will be repeated next year.

Introduction to Documentary Papyrology

Dr M Zellmann-Rohrer

An introduction to the study of Greek documentary papyri of the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. The subject will be taught primarily through case studies, with emphasis on the reading and interpretation of a range of documents. There will be broad coverage of historical, palaeographic and linguistic aspects of the texts, and an orientation will be given to important groups of documents and their Egyptian context within a chronological framework. A modest amount of background reading may be assigned before some sessions. The seminar is open to graduates and advanced undergraduates. A good knowledge of Greek is essential.

Week 1: Introduction: texts and materials, resources, methods. The earliest Greek documentary papyri.
Week 2: Ptolemaic period: the Zenon archive. Electronic resources.
Week 3: no meeting.
Week 4: Ptolemaic period: other private archives and some important official texts.
Week 5: Roman period: first century.
Week 6: Roman period: second century.
Week 7: Roman period: third century.
Week 8: Roman period: Late Antiquity.
Introduction to Literary Papyrology

Dr D Obbink

These lectures are not geared towards a particular paper, but lead into the “Advanced Literary Papyrology” sessions in Hilary Term.

Latin Language: Caesar, de bello Gallico

Dr T Franklinos

These lectures are aimed at the “Latin Language” paper for Honour Moderations in Classics.

There is a difference in prescription depending on which course is being taken.  Those reading for courses IA and IB should attend all four lectures (weeks 1–4); material to be covered by those reading for courses IC and IIA will be covered in weeks 1 and 2, though all are welcome to later lectures.

1: introductory material and 3.1–6 (all)
2: 3.7–13 (all)
3: 3.14–29 (IA & IB)
4: 1.1–11 (IA & IB)

Please bring a copy of the prescribed text (the OCT edited by du Pontet).

Latin Palaeography

Prof S Heyworth; Dr M Robinson

These lectures are for Subject 524: “Seneca, Medea” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

Lyric Poetry

Dr D Obbink; Dr A D'Angour

These lectures are for Subject 504: “Lyric Poetry” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

Lyric Poetry (Class)

Dr E Prodi; Dr A D'Angour

These classes are for Subject 504: “Lyric Poetry” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

Neronian Literature (Class)

Prof M Leigh

These classes are for Subject 512: “Neronian Literature” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

The Reception of Classical Literature in Poetry in English since 1900

Prof F Macintosh; Prof C Güthenke

These lectures are for Subject 519: “The Reception of Classical Literature in Poetry in English since 1900” in the Honour Schools of Literae Humaniores. and Classics & English.

Research Techniques in Classical Literature

Prof G Hutchinson

Seneca, Medea

Prof S Heyworth; Prof T Reinhardt

These classes are for Subject 524: “Seneca, Medea” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

 

Tacitus and Tiberius

Dr A Clark; Prof R Ash

These lectures are principally intended for those taking the paper of this name for Classics Mods or CAAH Prelims, but may be useful for anyone studying the early principate.

 

Week 1: The Prologue of the Annals and Tacitus’ vision of history (Rhiannon Ash)
Week 2: Germanicus and the mutinies in Annals 1 (Rhiannon Ash)
Week 3: Annals 3 and annalistic history (Rhiannon Ash)
Week 4: Tiberius and the imperial family (Anna Clark)
Week 5: Patterns and problems: structure and meaning in the first hexad (Rhiannon Ash)
Week 6: Senate matters (?) (Anna Clark)
Week 7: Beyond Rome: Controlling the provinces (Anna Clark)
Week 8: Views of Tiberius (Anna Clark)
Virgil, Aeneid

Dr Ll Morgan

These lectures are aimed at the “Virgil: Aeneid” paper for Honour Moderations in Classics.

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