Lectures

The Faculty lecture list is available online. Undergraduate lectures and graduate seminars are normally only open to current students of the University. Non-members of the University should contact the relevant lecturer or seminar organiser as well as the manager of the relevant venue in advance for permission to attend. All lectures take place in Weeks 1-8 of term and last for one hour unless otherwise stated.

Please note the following indications in the online lecture list:

* This class is only open to students by prior invitation.

(biennial) This lecture/class is given in alternate academic years and will not be repeated next year.

(lc) This lecture series will be recorded on the Panopto lecture capture system.

Academic staff and students of other universities and members of the public are welcome to attend research seminars and public lectures held in the Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies. Term cards for research seminars are published at Seminars.

Prospectuses for lectures and graduate seminars

Where lecturers have provided prospectuses for their lecture series or graduate seminars, they are listed below. Prospectuses are not available for all lecture series.

Hilary Term 2020

Corpus Christi Classical Seminar: Ethical Reading: Authenticity

Prof C Güthenke, Prof H Najman, Prof T Reinhardt

Euripides, Orestes: Text

Dr S Scullion

These lectures are for Subject 513: “Euripides, Orestes: papyri, manuscripts, text” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

Greek Coins II

Dr V Heuchert

Essential for the CAAH paper on 'Greek and Roman Coins' and for the M. Stud. and M. Phil. options in Greek Coinage / Greek Numismatics, but open to all with an interest in Greek history or coinage.

The lectures aim to provide an introduction to Hellenistic coinage and to the ways we study them.  The series continues the “Greek Coins I” lectures from Michaelmas Term that dealt with Archaic and Classical Greek coins.  There will be an opportunity at the end of each lecture to examine a selection of relevant coins.

  1. Cooperative Coinage
  2. The Coinages of Philip II and Alexander the Great
  3. Hellenistic Ruler Portraits
  4. Hellenistic Monetary Policies
  5. State and Finance in the Hellenistic Period
  6. Case Study: The (Hellenistic) Mint of Miletus
  7. Greek Coinage under the Roman Republic
  8. History from Coins? Evidence of the Graeco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek Kingdoms (S. Glenn)
Greek Prose Reading Class

Prof R Parker

We shall continue reading Plutarch's Life of Cicero from Michaelmas Term, 
but new participants are very welcome.  For the first session please prepare Chapters 27-29.

Historiography (Class)

Prof R Ash; Prof T Rood

This class is for Subject 503: “Historiography” in  the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools. 

Indo-European, Greek and Latin: Morphology

Prof. P. Probert

Together with the Phonology lectures from which they follow on, these are the core lectures for the 
philology subject in Classics Mods and the joint schools including Classics, and for the "Comparative 
Philology: Indo? European, Greek and Latin" paper in Greats and in the joint schools including Classics. 
They also form part of the teaching for the comparative philology papers in the taught graduate courses 
in Classics. Other interested people are very welcome. 

These lectures aim to introduce the morphological history of Greek and Latin and the morphology of 
their reconstructed ancestor, Proto-Indo-European; they also serve as an introduction to the methods 
and aims of reconstruction. Basic knowledge of either Latin or Greek (or both) is helpful; those taking 
Mods IB, IC, IIA, or IIB will be at no disadvantage.

Handouts will be provided and students will be encouraged to do some exercises; these are distributed 
at the end of each lecture and offer an opportunity for practice and reinforcement of new material and 
concepts. The Morphology course will begin in seventh week with the declension of nouns, and will 
continue in the first half of Trinity term.

These lectures will be repeated next year.

Indo-European, Greek and Latin: Phonology

Prof. P. Probert

Together with the Morphology lectures that will follow on from them, these are the core lectures for the 
philology subject in Classics Mods and the joint schools including Classics, and for the "Comparative 
Philology: Indo? European, Greek and Latin" paper in Greats and in the joint schools including Classics. 
They also form part of the teaching for the comparative philology papers in the taught graduate courses 
in Classics. Other interested people are very welcome. These lectures aim to introduce the phonological 
history of Greek and Latin and the phonology of their reconstructed ancestor, Proto-Indo-European; 
they also serve as an introduction to the methods and aims of reconstruction. Basic knowledge of either 
Latin or Greek (or both) is helpful; those taking Mods IB, IC, IIA, or IIB will be at no disadvantage.

Handouts will be provided and participants will be encouraged to do some exercises; these are 
distributed at the end of each lecture and offer an opportunity for practice and reinforcement of new 
material and concepts. The Phonology course will cover all the sounds reconstructed for the parent 
language, ending with the laryngeal theory. The Morphology course will begin in seventh week with the 
declension of nouns.

These lectures will be repeated next year.

Research Techniques in Classical Literature

Prof G Hutchinson

Seneca, Medea

Prof S Heyworth; Prof T Reinhardt

These classes are for Subject 524: “Seneca, Medea” in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores and associated joint schools.

 

Seneca, Natural Questions Text Seminar

Dr B Taylor

Week 1: Introduction, and preface to Book 3 (BT)

Week 2: Book 3.1-10, on rivers

              Book 3.27-30, on the Great Flood

Week 3: Book 4a.1-2.16, on the flooding of the Nile, and its known course

              Book 4b.3-7, on hail and hailstorms

Week 4: Book 5.1-6, on definitions and causes of wind

              Book 5.15, 18, on the human exploitation of nature

Week 5: Book 6.12-19, on air as a cause of earthquakes

              Book 6.27-32, on phenomena associated with the earthquake in Campania

Week 6: Book 7.22-29, on comets as akin to planets

              Book 7.30-32, on the demands of philosophy, and its contemporary decline

Week 7: Book 1.3-8, on rainbows

              Book 1.16-17, on improper and proper uses of mirrors

Week 8: Book 2.2-11, on the properties of air

              Book 2.52-9, on the effects and causes of lightning

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