Dr Tosca Lynch

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After gaining a BMus in Classical Piano, a BA and an MPhil in Ancient Philosophy in Italy, I undertook doctoral research in Classics at the University of St Andrews under the supervision of Prof. Stephen Halliwell. From 2013 to 2015 I worked as a Postdoctoral Associate at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, and I have joined Jesus College as a Junior Research Fellow in Classics in October 2016.

My main research field is ancient Greek music, with a special interest in the Athenian debate on mousiké. The research questions I pursued in recent years fall into three main areas: 

1) Ancient Greek literature and philosophy, with special focus on Plato's musical aesthetics and its educational, psychological and ethical implications, and on Euripides' reflections on the ethical and aesthetic power of music. 
2) Technical aspects of ancient musical performances (harmoníai, instruments, etc.) and their cultural as well as performative significance; the Greek musical documents. 
3) Ancient Rhythmics and Metre, especially Aristoxenus' Elementa rhythmica and the rhythmical and metrical theories discussed in Aristides Quintilianus' De Musica. 

Currently I am completing the first of two planned monographs on Plato and music (provisionally entitled 'Plato’s musical êthos and the "Revolution" of the New Music: ancient Greek modes, rhythms and instruments') and I am co-editing with Prof. Eleonora Rocconi (University of Pavia–Cremona) the Blackwell Companion to Ancient Greek and Roman Music. My next research project will explore the importance of music in Euripidean tragedy from a variety of angles, ranging from technical questions to broader cultural and literary aspects.

Ancient Greek Music; Rhythmics and metre; Plato's musical thought and aesthetics; ancient education; music in Euripidean tragedy.

 

Full Publications: dr_tosca_lynch_publication_list_oct_2017.pdf

Selected Publications:

Selected Publications

  • 'Tuning the lyre, tuning the soul’: harmonía and the kósmos of the soul between Plato’s Republic and Timaeus.

  • ‘Tuning The Lyre, Tuning The Soul’: Harmonía And The Kósmos Of The Soul Between Plato’s Republic And Timaeus

  • Without Timotheus, much of our melopoiia would not exist; but without Phrynis, there wouldn’t have been Timotheus”: Pherecrates’ twelve strings, the strobilos and the harmonic paranomia of the New Music

  • The seductive voice of the aulos in Plato’s Symposium: from the dismissal of the auletris to Alcibiades’ praise of Socrates-auletes

  • Reconstructing Damon: Music, Wisdom Teaching and Politics in Perikles’ Athens , written by Wallace, R. W.

  • More
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