Classics > People > Faculty Members > Judith McKenzie

Dr Judith S. McKenzie
BA (Hons) Sydney, PhD Sydney

Offices:

University Research Lecturer, Faculty of Classics
Director, Manar Al-Athar

Address:

The Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies
66, St. Giles'
Oxford
OX1 3LU

Tel No: (01865) 610236
Email: judith.mckenzie@arch.ox.ac.uk

Link1: http://www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk

Profile:

Judith McKenzie studied Archaeology, alongside Chemistry and English (Greek and Ancient History) at the University of Sydney, where she also completed her PhD. She lived in a cave in the rock-cut city of Petra in Jordan while working on her PhD and The Architecture of Petra. She was Annual Scholar of the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem. In 1987, she came to Oxford, where she subsequently began work on The Architecture of Alexandria and Egypt 300 BC–AD 700 at St Hugh's College, while Rhys-Davids Junior Research Fellow, followed by a British Academy Post-doctoral Research Fellow. She became a Queen Elizabeth Fellow at the University of Sydney and spent a year at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Since 2003 she has been director of the Khirbet et-Tannur Nabataean Temple Project www.classics.ox.ac.uk/khirbet-et-tannur-nabataean-temple-project.html. In 2012 she established the open-access Manar al-Athar photo-archive www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk, while working on the Leverhulme Trust Research Project Late Antique Egypt and the Holy Land: Archaeology, History, and Religious Change www.classics.ox.ac.uk/late-antique-egypt-holyland.html (PI Neil McLynn). Since September 2016, she has been Principal Investigator of the project, Monumental Art of the Christian and Early Islamic East: Cultural Identities and Classical Heritage, www.classics.ox.ac.uk/monumental-art-of-the-christian-and-early-islamic-east.html for which she was awarded an ERC Advanced Grant.

Research Keywords:

Greco-Roman and Late Antique East and Egypt; Alexandria; Petra; Religious continuity and change; Architecture, art, sculpture

Research Interests:

McKenzie's interest in the architecture, sculpture, and religion of the Nabataeans, the desert tribe of the 3rd century BC to 6th century AD, and their capital Petra began with her work on the architecture of Petra, focusing on the city's larger facades and the free-standing buildings, and on the tombs at Medain Saleh. She demonstrated that the main classical influence on the architecture of Petra in the 1st centuries BC and AD came from Alexandria. That led her to more extensively explore the architecture of Alexandria and Egypt, from Alexander the Great to after the Islamic Conquest. Her re-examination of Nabataean sculpture for the 2003 Petra exhibition in New York resulted in the Khirbet et-Tannur Nabataean Temple Project www.classics.ox.ac.uk/khirbet-et-tannur-nabataean-temple-project.html , when she discovered that the scientific finds from Nelson Glueck's 1937 excavations of the temple were in the Semitic Museum, Harvard University. Studying those finds led her into Nabataean religious practice and iconography. Her study of the late antique Ethiopian Garima Gospel illuminations arose as a result of the depictions of architecture in them, some of which have Alexandrian connections, alongside Ethiopian ones.

McKenzie's experience working in Syro-Palestine/the Levant and Egypt, since 1981, led to her interest in the continuity, as well as change, which occurred at religious sites in the region in late antiquity (AD 250–750), through the transition of the dominant religion from paganism to Christianity and, in turn, to Islam, resulting in collaboration with Neil McLynn on the Leverhulme Trust Research Project Late Antique Egypt and the Holy Land: Archaeology, History, and Religious Change www.classics.ox.ac.uk/late-antique-egypt-holyland.html .In response to scholars working in the region needing photographs of buildings and art at sites which they could not readily visit, she established the open-access photo-archive www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk in order to present the extensive visual record of sites collected. Since then, many of these monuments have been damaged or are endangered, making these records increasingly important. Many of these buildings are (or were) decorated with monumental scenes, on wall-mosaics, floor mosaics, wall-paintings, and relief sculptures. These artworks became the subject of her current ERC project, Monumental Art of the Christian and Early Islamic East: Cultural Identities and Classical Heritage. www.classics.ox.ac.uk/monumental-art-of-the-christian-and-early-islamic-east.html

Project links:

www.classics.ox.ac.uk/khirbet-et-tannur-nabataean-temple-project.html
www.classics.ox.ac.uk/monumental-art-of-the-christian-and-early-islamic-east.html
www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk
www.classics.ox.ac.uk/late-antique-egypt-holyland.html

Full Publications:

Click here for a downloadable pdf of full publications:  JSMcKenzie_Publications_8Oct2016.pdf

Selected Publications:

With F. Watson, M. Gervers et al., The Garima Gospels: Early Illuminated Gospels Books from Ethiopia, (Oxford 2016).

'Glass Tesserae from Hagios Polyeuktos, Constantinople: their Early Byzantine Affiliations', in Neighbours and successor of Rome: Traditions of Glass Production and Use in Europe and the Middle East in the Later First Millennium AD, D. Keller, J. Price, and C. Jackson (eds.), Co-author: N. Schibille, (Oxford 2014), 114-127.

'Alexandria on the Barada: the Mosaics of the Great Mosque in Damascus', in New Light on Old Glass: Byzantine Mosaics, L. James and C. Entwistle (eds.), (London 2013), 291-309.

'Iconoclasm at Petra and Other Nabataean Sites', in Studies on Nabataean Culture I, N. Khairy and T. Weber (eds.), (Amman 2013), 1-25, Notes: [in Arabic].

'The Alexandrian Tychaion, a Pantheon?', Co-author: A.T. Reyes, Journal of Roman Archaeology, Vol: 26, (2013), 36-52.

The Nabataean Temple at Khirbet et-Tannur, Jordan, Volume 1. Architecture and Religion, Co-author: J. Greene, A.T. Reyes, C. Alexander, D. Barrett, B. Gilmour, M. O'Hea, S. Schmid, W. Wetterstrom, S. Whitcher Kansa, (2013).

The Nabataean Temple at Khirbet et-Tannur, Jordan, Volume 2. Cultic Offerings, Vessels, and Other Specialist Reports, Co-author: J. Greene, A.T. Reyes, C. Alexander, D. Barrett, B. Gilmour, M. O'Hea, S. Schmid, W. Wetterstrom, S. Whitcher Kansa, (2013).

'The Context of the Khirbet et-Tannur Zodiac, Jordan', Co-author: A.T. Reyes, and J.A. Greene, ARAM, Vol: 24, (2012 [2014]), 379-420.

'A Commercial Nursery at Abu Hummus, Egypt, and the Reuse of Amphoras in the Roman Plant Trade', Co-author: M. Kenawi, E. Macaulay-Lewis, Journal of Roman Archaeology, Vol: 25, (2012), 195-225.

'Late Roman Glass from the 'Great Temple' at Petra and Khirbet et-Tannur, Jordan - Technology and Provenance', Co-author: N. Schibille, P. Degryse, M. O'Hea, A. Izmer, F. Vanhaecke, Archaeometry, Vol: 54.6, (2012), 997-1022.

Carving Petra (and Hegra) [review article], Journal of Roman Archaeology , Vol: 23, (2010), 751-759.

The Architecture of Alexandria and Egypt, 300 B.C. - A.D. 700, (Pelican History of Art (London 2007) Paperback 2010).

The Serapeum of Alexandria: its Destruction and Reconstruction [review article], Journal of Roman Archaeology , Vol: 22, (2009), 772-782.

'The Place in Late Antique Alexandria 'where the Alchemists and Scholars sit...was like Stairs' ' in Alexandria: Auditoria of Kom el-Dikka and Late Antique Education, T. Derda, T. Markiewicz, and E. Wipszycka (eds.), Journal of Juristic Papyrology Suppl. 8, (2007), 55-83.

'Reconstructing the Serapeum in Alexandria from the Archaeological Evidence', Co-author: S. Gibson and A.T. Reyes, Journal of Roman Studies, Vol: 94, (2004), 73-114.

'Carvings in the Desert: the Sculpture of Petra and Khirbet et-Tannur', in Petra Rediscovered, Lost City of the Nabataeans, G. Markoe (ed.), (2003), 169-195.

'Reconstruction of the Nabataean Temple Complex at Khirbet et-Tannur, Jordan', Co-author: S. Gibson and A.T. Reyes, Palestine Exploration Quarterly, Vol: 134, (2002), 44-83.

'Keys from Egypt and the East: Observations on Nabataean Culture in the Light of Recent Discoveries', Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research, Vol: 324, (2001), 97-112.

"Faces in the Rock at Petra and Medain Saleh", Co-author: A.T. Reyes and A. Schmidt-Colinet, Palestine Exploration Quarterly, [Humbaba], (1998), 35-50.

'The Rediscovery of the Assyrian Reliefs at Canford School, Dorset', in From Nineveh to New York: the Strange Story of the Metropolitan Museum Assyrian Collection and the Hidden Masterpiece at Canford Manor, J.M. Russell (ed.), (1997), 173-189.

'The Transmutation of Base Metals into Gold: A Solution to the Essential Mystery of Alchemy', Co-author: D. Jacobson, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, Vol: 17, (1992), 326-331, Notes: [On depletion gilding as a lost method of "making" gold].

'The Bedouin at Petra: the Historical Sources', Levant, Vol: 23, (1991), 139-145.

The Architecture of Petra, (OUP 1990).