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Course Structure for Literae Humaniores (Classics)

Greek and Roman History  Philosophy  Greek and Latin Literature  Greek and Roman Archaeology  Philology and Linguistics 

 

Please use the links above to view descriptions of papers within each subject area. These descriptions should give you an idea of the types of papers on offer. For valid paper combinations and details of the number and type of papers that you would need to take refer to the exam regulations (links to the right). Not all papers may be available for any given year.

Details of the course structure can be found in the exam regulations, however a summary is given below.

There are two courses, Lit. Hum. I and II (Classics I and II). If you have done Mods IA, IB, or IC, you will
normally go on to take LH I; if you have done Mods IIA or IIB, LH II.


Literae Humaniores I (Classics I)

In Course I you must offer eight subjects, of which four must be text-based, including at least one in Greek and at least one in Latin (see below). There are certain restrictions on the combinations on offer:


Ancient History: you may offer up to five subjects.
Philosophy: you may offer up to five subjects.
Greek/Latin Literature: you may offer up to five subjects.
Greek and Roman Archaeology: you may offer one or two subjects (or up to three if
one is a thesis).
Philology and Linguistics: you may offer one or two subjects (or up to three if one is a
thesis).


Each subject is examined in one three-hour paper, except that (i) some subjects are
examined by pre-submitted essays; (ii) for certain text-based subjects the translation test is
included in a separate paper, and (iii) under certain conditions, one subject may be a thesis.


Literae Humaniores II (Classics II)

In Course II you must offer eight subjects, except that TWO of these may be replaced by
Second Classical Language (that is, Greek for those who took Mods IIA and Latin for those
who took Mods IIB).
If you take Second Classical Language, the restrictions on your choice of other subjects are
as follows:


Text-based subjects: you must take at least three text-based subjects in addition to
Second Classical Language itself.
Ancient History: you may offer up to four subjects.
Philosophy: you may offer up to four subjects.
Greek/Latin Literature: you may offer up to four subjects.
Greek and Roman Archaeology: you may offer one or two subjects (or up to three if
one is a thesis).
Philology and Linguistics: you may offer one or two subjects (or up to three if one is a
thesis).


Each subject is examined in one three-hour paper, except that (i) some subjects are
examined by pre-submitted essays; (ii) for certain text-based subjects the translation test is
included in a separate paper, and (iii) under certain conditions, one subject may be a thesis.


If you offer Second Classical Language in the language in question you may if you wish offer
Greek Literature of the 5th Century BC or Latin Literature of the 1st Century BC without
offering the associated translation paper, but in that case the Literature subject will not count
as text-based.
If you do not take Second Classical Language, the restrictions are the same as for Lit. Hum.
I, except that your four text-based subjects may be all in Greek or all in Latin, and you do not
need to offer one in each.


The text-based papers are (III.3, 4 and 7 can count either as Greek or as Latin):

(1) Greek:
I. The Early Greek World and Herodotus' Histories: 650 to 479 BC,
Thucydides and the Greek World: 479 BC to 403 BC,
The End of the Peloponnesian War to the Death of Philip II of Macedon: 403 BC to 336 BC;
Polybius Rome and the Mediterranean: 241 BC to 146 BC
II. 130 Plato, Republic; 131 Plato, Theaetetus and Sophist; 132 Aristotle, Nicomachean
Ethics
; 133 Aristotle, Physics; 134 Sextus Empiricus.
III. 1 Greek Literature of the 5th Century (‘Greek Core’); 3 Historiography; 4 Lyric Poetry;
5 Early Greek Hexameter Poetry; 6 Greek Tragedy; 7 Comedy; 8 Hellenistic Poetry;
13 Euripides, Orestes; 15 (b) Byzantine Literature; 15 (c) Modern Greek Poetry.
V. 1 Greek Historical Linguistics.


(2) Latin:
I. Republic in Crisis 146 BC to 46 BC
Rome, Italy and Empire from Caesar to Claudius: 46 BC to AD 54
II. 135 Latin Philosophy.
III. 2 Latin Literature of the 1st Century (‘Latin Core’); 3 Historiography; 4 Lyric Poetry; 7
Comedy; 9 Cicero; 10 Ovid; 11 Latin Didactic; 12 Neronian Literature; 14 (a) Seneca,
Medea;
14 (b) Catullus; 15 (a) The Conversion of Augustine.
V. 2 Latin Historical Linguistics.