Classics > People > Academic Staff > Bruno Currie

Dr Bruno Currie
MA DPhil Oxf

Offices:

Associate Professor in Classical Languages and Literature, Faculty of Classics
Monro Fellow and Tutor in Classics, Oriel College

Address:

Oriel College
Oxford
OX1 4EW

Tel No: (01865) 276510
Email: bruno.currie@oriel.ox.ac.uk

Dr Bruno Currie

Research Keywords:

Early Greek epic (especially Homer and Hesiod), Greek lyric (especially Pindar), Greek religion

Research Interests:

Dr Currie teaches Greek and Latin languages and literature. His chief research interests are in ancient Greek poetry (especially epic and lyric), ancient Greek religion, and in the interaction of these two. He is the author of Pindar and the Cult of Heroes (2005) and co-editor of Epic Interactions. Perspectives on Homer, Virgil, and the Epic Tradition Presented to Jasper Griffin by Former Pupils (2006). He is currently working on a book called Hesiod and Myth.

Selected Publications:

Pindar and Bacchylides, in Space in Ancient Greek Literature, (Brill 2012), 285-303.

The Iliad, Gilgamesh, and Neoanalysis, in Homeric Contexts: Neoanalysis and the Interpretation of Oral Poetry, Montanari F, Rengakos A (eds.), (De Gruyter 2012), 535-572.

Epinician choregia: funding a Pindaric chorus, in Archaic and Classical Choral Song, Athanassaki L, Bowie E (eds.), (2011), 269-310.

Perspectives on neoanalysis from the archaic hymns to Demeter, in Relative Chronology in Early Greek Epic Poetry, Andersen A (ed.), (Cambridge University Press 2011).

L'Ode 11 di Bacchilide: il mito delle Pretidi nella lirica corale, nella poesia epica, e nella mitografia, in Tra panellenismo e tradizioni locali. Generi poetici e storiografia, (Edizioni dell'Orso 2010), 211-253.

P.OXY. 115/44: Demosthenes 19.1-7, 9-13, (Oxyrhynchus Papyri 2002).

A note on Catullus 63.5, (Classical Quarterly 1996), 579-81.

Hesiod on Human History, in History Without Historians: Greeks and their Past in the Archaic and Classical Ages, Marincola J (ed.), (Edinburgh University Press (n.d.)).

Sophocles and Hero Cult, in A Companion to Sophocles, (Wiley-Blackwell (n.d.)).